Is kids mental health being left behind?

I sent a tweet last week that seemed to hit a chord. It started with a chat in the office about school homework with Sam Hicks and the pressure that builds around doing it, who does it, tuition etc. It is something that is a regular conversation with all parents of kids at a certain age. Parents will pretty much universally agree that as kids they did not have to do as much at a certain age, around 9ish. No one remembers the same level of activity, homework, after school activities, weekend stuff, it’s frenetic for a nine year old. The most important thing for me, it’s seven days a week.

The thing is, it coincides with the sea changes going on in society and in the work places. Just look at the ‘interruption’ to BGT the other night? At our work place and many others over the world companies are working hard to support people who may be suffering with mental health. There are very visible initiatives like Mediacom with Josh pushing the agenda very hard, at Spotify we have Heart and Soul at its core with lots of opportunities for support and to talk openly which some of our team have been doing. It’s all so important that these issues are discussed.

Beyond ‘corporate’ acknowledgement there are smaller initiatives. My leadership team have agreed that we should not be emailing the teams after working hours, at weekends and not have fifty emails waiting for them at 6am Monday. We have been really working on this over time, when my directs are on holiday I have a hard rule that says they go on holiday and switch off. It sends shivers when people say ‘yeah I am off but will be on email.’ Don’t do it, don’t do a poor job of your holiday and a poor job of working and at the end or it all, not properly relax. That’s no use to me. All my directs know how I feel on this and I encourage them to do the same. A break is vital.

So all good, we are on it as adults. We know however that education moves slower than industry, schools can get stuck in old fashioned ruts, they do not adapt fast enough. So here is the thing. Why is it good for us to switch off when the kids are getting homework on Fridays for the weekend, why is it ok for kids to come home and work when we get to take a break in the main, why is it ok for kids to have to work through holidays when we don’t. Have we forgotten that their minds are more fragile than ours, we are setting behaviours, we add to that stress with arguments about how hard they are trying or how well they are doing? Pressure, lack of rest, lack of relax, arguments and more. If we were to set this as our approach to the work environment we would not hold on to a single employee.

The worst of this is that it’s tough to say here is what we do about it..stop doing homework gets reprimand at school and depending on schools will leave kids behind. So it’s open ended but feel like we should keep talking about it and asking schools what they intend to do. Certainly my next parents evening, it will be my first question.

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Diversity is more than just Gender.

How can we adjust how we think about diversity? Diversity is currently dominated by gender, and there is so much going on in that space, which is fantastic, long may it continue, but there is a much wider issue we have to face together.  It has been some time that I have been going into schools and talking to students and seeing just how different our working environments are from all of these back grounds.

It is an area that for me is important we begin to focus on more, we pay lip service to it right now, so here are some thoughts about where we can all start to adjust and plan for the future. We should ask ourselves the difficult questions about what we all stand for and whether we really want to drive change.

As a group of companies we need to set some new rules of engagement for the industry if we are going to initiate change. Some of the scenarios that would be fantastic to see change are the following:

  1. Hiring has to come from outside of Grads, every business should be creating plans to hire a number of school leavers every year and from non white middle class backgrounds, and definitely not related to the boss.
  2. Every organisation should think about the make up of what they are doing, my latest observation of MediaWeek judges all being white middle class people is an example, I am certain that someone ticked the gender diversity box but nothing else.
  3. Think about the sub sets of organisations – if you are promoting female diversity and there is a room full of 500 white middle class people, we should not be content with that, we should be supporting diversity within gender.
  4. If you are creating a List of important people then it should not be the same old, same old, there are talented people out there, we have to find them and create inspiration.
  5. If we look at panels, events etc all you see is the gender discussion – we need to think outside of that, we need to think about how the panels are made up to represent the world outside.
  6. Kill two birds with one stone – if you focus on helping under privileged schools rather than the usual grad schemes, you will naturally drive diversity of thinking and people.

It is at the grass roots we are failing – we are not bringing in enough talent early on, when we do it is really fulfilling. Our work placement programme is in its infancy but it only pulls from state schools to make sure we are creating opportunities. It is something I am hopeful we can continue to grow, I would encourage everyone to start these opportunities if you have not already.

Whether it is mentoring, helping organisations that are trying to do this, the industry press, the Twitter commentators, can we all start asking our self the question of whether what we are doing is either bringing in diverse talent, or inspiring it through highlighting the talent we already have in the business. This is not a rant, it is not a preach, it is a gentle call to arms. After my last blog and twitter engagements on mentoring, I know there is so much appetite to do better on this, but it feels on the fringe, so hoping mainstream industry can lead the charge. I am excited to try and do more after engaging with some of the organisations that contacted me earlier in the month, hopefully we all can do our bit.

Mentoring: How can I help?

One really important factor that I have discovered since moving from agency to sales is the ability to do more, more easily at my level. The array of things that get categorised under ‘more’ is significant, but on the whole they all have one thing in common, a request for money. I am not exactly sure why, but generally speaking, sales companies find budget to support a whole range of causes. We are asked by charities, by clients, by industry bodies, by trade titles and so on. It is brilliant to be able to do so much to help out and at Spotify we really support a range of different organisations. I have enjoyed that so much for the last two years, it has been very fulfilling.

Thing is, I also feel like we jump around and try to do too much / everything and although that is admirable, it is also perhaps skin deep at times. As a company we can do this to a point, but as an individual it becomes even harder. One person, especially someone who is travelling a lot and has all the usual time pressures cant do everything so more recently I have been considering what is most important to me, and what have I really enjoyed.

A number of years ago I started Speakers4schools presentations, and I have consistently been doing them ever since. I am pleased to say that we then moved from just presenting to working with an extension of Speakers4schools, NextGen who encourage their speakers to create work placements in their businesses. I am hugely grateful to my HR team who have allowed me to do this, and all the band members across the business that supported with their time and expertise. More recently I have been thinking about how to focus my energies and try to do more with less time and what is it that I really enjoy and adds value. Mentoring has always been fun, not the deep, lets meet every two weeks for years type mentoring, but the shorter, more specifics advice that when given could make a difference to someone, and even get them a job, they would otherwise of not had the chance to get.

As I reflect on our industry with a real focus now on gender diversity and indeed wider diversity, I still feel as if we are talking to the same types of groups, we still have not truly  moved the agenda. My personal goal and where I can, hopefully with support of Spotify, is to try and help under privileged young adults who are not getting access to the expertise that some schools or areas do. Speakers4schools has introduced that to me, and I feel it is great in its own right, but would also serve to bring more diversity into our industry and so I wanted to explore how I could help. I need opportunities that can mould around a busy schedule so advice, mentoring, speed mentoring etc is interesting. Today I was amazed at the response to a simple tweet I sent this morning.

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The response was fantastic not a ‘likes’ count, but people passionately responding and making suggestions, and it served to highlight how many amazing things are happening, and so I thought it would be great to list out all those responses so everyone has a chance to identify opportunities that they may like to get involved in.

Female mentoring with BloomUK http://www.bloom.org/the-exchange

Brixton Finishing School for underprivileged young adults http://www.hoxtonunited.com/

Media Trust http://www.mediatrust.org

IAA Speed Mentoring sessions http://www.iaauk.london/events/iaa-mentoring

DevelopHer – Elevating women through community based opps http://www.eepurl.com/bJAKKL

Creative Mentor Network http://www.creativementornetwork.org

Mediatel Speed mentoring http://www.mediatel.co.uk/newsline/2019/05/02/sign-up-for-free-speed-mentoring-2/

There are others no doubt, so add in the comments if you want to keep it all in this article. Bottom line, there is the chance to give your time, and there are different routes you can take, but for me it is time to focus and I am excited to explore how I can help!

Interview with M&M on Global trends pre Festival of Media

What are the key trends and insights driving global media in 2018?
The key insight is that not everything is as it seems. We have come to question so many things around digital media and we are seeing erosion of trust across the board. No one can ignore this as a trend. The positive trend though is a thorough reevaluation of
where advertisers place media. This is encouraging for those who love this industry versus those who just want to make high margin revenue. It means that premium advertising environments are becoming far more sought after and the belief that context and environment are not important is slowing fading and becoming a distant memory. I hope we see this trend continue and the blind, low CPM retargeting networks fade away.

What is the toughest challenge the industry faces?
We have to get ourselves out of the vicious cycle of pitches begetting lower and lower CPM campaigns. This type of behaviour means agencies squeeze publishers, only looking for low cost inventory, and then find themselves at a higher risk of fraud, which then creates mistrust. We need agencies to charge properly for their services, clients to pay for quality service from whomever is best placed to provide it and then we will see a move away from opacity. We are still confronted by too much of a ‘we have to pay less than last year’ attitude. It is a path that leads nowhere for all involved.

What does success look like for you in 2018?
Spotify is on a very exciting journey. My role was to re-look at the European business and accelerate positive momentum and a strong proposition in market. We are well on our way to doing that, and it has been a lot of fun. 2018 is a year in which the topics of audioand programmatic are converging, so we look forward to working with key advertisers and partners on bringing this innovation into the mainstream. Success stories leveraging data and dynamic audio creative suggest this is just the start of a fabulous year.

The second area I will be focusing on is showing the industry that we have some of the best video advertising inventory in town. We only sell completed video impressions, with 100% viewability. Audio has traditionally been our bread and butter but video is a large part of our business and we want more brands to enjoy its benefits. Our current customers all report strong results so we hope the education we are doing across the industry will be music to people’s ears.

What is the key to winning new business?
I  don’t think that has ever changed, whether on the agency or publisher side. All you need to ask yourself is whether you are helping the advertiser grow their business. New business needs to be built on insights that unlock something fundamental (and often
very simple) that will create a reaction in consumers. Too often in new business one gets carried away with internal structures and technology. Keep it simple and customer-focused and you can win.

What do you find clients want more than ever?

There is still an eternal hunt for the new thing, the first thing etc, but actually if you just come up with great ideas those usually win out. As I mentioned there is a trend for better environments and contexts taking us back to the basics of advertising. Note
that 2017 was a very strong year for traditional channels like radio, outdoor etc. At Spotify we continue to innovate, which is what makes the company an exciting place to be. And where we develop innovations our partners get to be the first to try things
out, which makes selling a whole lot easier.

How does the industry develop measurement standards for digital that are universal?
Sucha big question.. The only possible answer is relentless collaboration involving both the biggest and smallest players and this is going to be even more true with the GDPR implementation. My view is to worry less about common measurement and keep focused on common standards. Some of the basic requirements are very low in terms of viewability etc. I believe we should raise the bar significantly as a starting point. ‘Three seconds partially-in-view’ inventory should not be the benchmark.

How important is inclusivity to your business?
Inclusivity is enormously important to Spotify. As you might expect from a Swedish business, inclusion is at the core of the Spotify culture and values, and we are putting a great deal of focus on D&I initiatives. Indeed, just this week we held our annual, global, Diversity and Inclusion Summit at Spotify’s Stockholm headquarters, which was an opportunity for members of staff from all over the world to discuss ideas and opportunities to drive change and innovation where needed at Spotify and to make us even more of a leader in this space.

How do media owners and tech companies capitalize on the changing media landscape?
Combine good environment, trustworthy inventory and clever use of technology and data. Technology has a bad rep at the moment, but it is not technology that is the problem, rather how it is used. Used correctly you can achieve great things.

Audio is seeing a resurgence and we are very happy about that, but that’s not about traditional ‘radio’. Across connected cars, homes, voice assistants, speakers, TVs, fridges, you need an audio strategy that is future proof. However, we believe the real opportunity is in combining audio formats with video to generate the greatest impact. The media landscape is definitely changing and Spotify is in a great place to be at the heart of it.

Marco will be speaking at Festival of Media Global next month and Spotify is one of the key partners of the event.

Happy 30th! The Zenith Media impact on my career.

Zenith Media is 30 years old today.  There has been a lot of water under the bridge since then, our industry has changed in so many ways but nevertheless, that agency shaped many of my thoughts and approaches and I am grateful for those early years.

I was first encouraged to apply to agencies by my brother who was a sales exec at Autoexpress who said that ‘I would be good on agency side’ and he told me to write to Andy Tilley the MD of Zenith at the time. So I wrote, I faxed, multiple times and eventually got an interview with Tim Greatrex. I got the job.

What was Zenith like back then? What was Media like? Well let’s start with the shed at Paddington, no, not the Paddington you know today, the high rises, the fancy station, the river with its restaurants and cafes, no this was derelict land in the middle of council estates and drab, redundant looking office buildings, a place where people looked unhappy at all times, except when you walked into the one pub, straight opposite the building, The Dudley. The Dudley was a place we spent a lot of time, well most lunches and evenings to be exact, it was ‘our local’ it was home from home and so much fun was had there. People were ejected, fought, laughed, competed, celebrated, commiserated, met the loves of their life or of the night, you name it. The Dudley could solve most ills. The king of the Dudley was of course John Lynch although everyone went from CEO to graduate, each with their side of the pub, even press and TV had subtle areas of dominance.

The office atmosphere as a graduate was exactly what you might have imagined, full of testosterone, a buying floor, TV in particular, it was full of smoke as we smoked all day long and although a male environment, many strong women flourished. I worked for two strong female leaders in Yvonne Scullion and Tracey Stern, I hope that set me up for the rest of my career to appreciate female leaders as the equal of anyone, but there were many more future leaders with Anna Campbell, Cyanne Bonnell, Rachel Forde, Marie Carey, Natalie Cummins amongst many others. It was a time where we learned to be accountable to clients, if something went wrong then we had to ring up our clients and explain, not hide behind email, we had to fight for our media plans, it was a time where your TV schedule was everything and I had sleepless nights if I was not securing what I had personally committed to, somehow the platform buys and AI and Algos of today blunt that or at least give you excuses. No, I had to fight with Mark Finnegan who invariably stole my centre break of coronation street on Friday for his newspaper accounts, to me it was everything.

By today’s standard no doubt it was a non PC environment and would not live up to the standards we ask of people today, but the class of ’96 onwards created a strong bond that to today is still probably some of the closest ties we have in media. I know we all root for each other and our careers and the media world actually revolves around the silent axis of ex Zenith employees. Just like publisher side revolves around Microsoft.

We were taught to work hard, play hard, and we have all learned that that approach needs tempering with the advent of always on technology, but the fundamentals still hold true. Enjoy working, and you won’t mind going the extra mile, have a great team and atmosphere around you and everything seems possible. In those days we could switch off and head home, difficult today, in those days, working from home was unheard of, mainly as we lacked technology to connect us, but the heart and soul of Zenith and what it taught me to expect from work remain about giving a shit about your colleagues and your work.

A testament to Zenith that there are many still there to this day, at least in the group and many returning in recent weeks, perhaps we are all destined to return to the place we loved the most? So many behaviours are now being realised to not be acceptable anymore but it was not all bad, there was a lot to look back on and celebrate and every time I walk in Zenith reception anywhere in the world there is always that reminder. What we all long deep down is to receive a farewell card of the ilk we used to get back then – we wish limping phone repair man well.

Marketing Week Article: Advertising on Spotify

Original article by Charlotte Rogers in Marketing Week – here is the original

Today Spotify will embark on one of the most hotly anticipated initial public offerings (IPOs) since Twitter went public in 2013 and Snapchat started selling shares back.

The Swedish streaming service has taken an unconventional approach, opting for a direct listing which circumvents the cost of an IPO by simply enabling existing shares to be traded on the New York Stock Exchange.

The chance to buy shares in Spotify is likely to prove extremely popular with investors. Globally the streaming service has amassed 71 million premium subscribers, up 46% year on year, and 157 million active users, an increase of 28% since 2016.

The average customer spends 25 hours a month streaming music on Spotify. Spanning 65 markets, Spotify’s audience has, to date, created two billion playlists from a library of more than 35 million songs.

Europe is the company’s largest market with 58 million monthly active users, accounting for 37% of its total audience. Spotify claimed a 42% share of the global streaming market in 2016, boasting a 95% share in Sweden, 59% in the UK and 41% in the US.

The streaming service has a dual subscriptions and advertising business model. Premium subscriptions accounted for 90% of Spotify’s total revenue in 2017, according to documents filed with the US Securities and Exchange Commission on 23 March, in preparation for the IPO.

“It’s almost a return of radio-like thinking because brands now have to have their own unique sound.’
Neil Shah, Smirnoff

Last year premium subscriptions delivered €3.7bn (£3.2bn) in revenue, up from €2.7bn (£2.4bn) in 2016, dwarfing the ad supported side of the business, which generated €416m (£365m) in 2017. Its ad business did make a profit of €43m (£38m) for the first time last year, however, after making a loss of €35m (£31m) the previous year.

Spotify has approximately 90 million ad supported users, typically aged between 18 to 34, who are given limited, shuffle-only access to the platform’s full catalogue. Brands serve display, audio and video advertising to these listeners, delivered through impressions.

Despite being a far smaller element of the business, Spotify’s advertising arm has increased revenues by 41% since 2016, prompting the streaming giant to describe it as a “strong and viable” element of the business with “considerable long-term opportunity for growth”

To explore the possibilities of enhancing its ad revenue, Spotify is working on a number of different formats, including podcast partnerships with publishers like Buzzfeed, sponsored playlists and self-serve advertising platforms, as well as trialling skippable audio ads and finding new ways to use programmatic.

In March, Spotify revealed its first ever 3D audiovisual advert, created in collaboration with film company Lionsgate UK to promote the release of horror film Ghost Stories.

Audio from the original trailer was re-purposed to give a 3D audio effect on top of the existing trailer, creating an immersive experience. In the first week of release the 3D ad received click-through rates up 50% from benchmark level, according to Spotify stats.

Last month the streaming giant also rolled out its self-service Ad Studio feature to the UK, which allows brands to create their own adverts within the platform.

The advertiser picks its audience based on age, gender, location, activity and musical taste, selecting whether to opt for mobile, desktop or both. They then set the budget and campaign dates, and use Spotify insights to track the campaign’s success.

Spotify managing director of sales for Europe, Marco Bertozzi, believes Ad Studio will open the possibility for smaller advertisers to get involved on the platform.

“I think at the moment we tend towards working with big clients and agencies,” he explains.

“Ad Studio is going to allow us to open up a whole raft of new, potentially smaller advertisers, who will be able to log in individually and build their own campaigns.”

Spotify is also keen to take on mainstream radio. The streamer believes it can differentiate itself from radio’s “linear model” by offering personalised experiences based on real-time insights into listeners’ behaviour across a variety of devices from smartphones and desktops, to car audio, games consoles and in-home devices.

This all plays into a resurgent interest in audio seen over the past year, as advertisers begin work on defining the sound of their brand, Bertozzi explains.

“With Spotify we have the intimacy that radio has always delivered, but because we can apply the data and insight it’s really important that that creative message matches those moments adequately.

“If you just get a jarring radio ad you’re probably missing an opportunity. Think about the creative and how it sounds to someone in that intimate moment. It’s vital you tailor your message.”

This opinion is shared by Cristina Sarraille, senior strategist at media agency We Are Social, who believes brands need to start thinking about how their brand sounds and what position this occupies in the wider cultural landscape.

“We got into this area over the past few years of sound blindness, where everyone was so excited to think about narratives around images and text, ignoring the use of sound in the way we communicate about the brand,” she argues.

“An agency may say, ‘let’s work with Spotify’. But the brand and the agency should step back and say hold on, do we have a sound for our brand? Do we actually understand the music ecosystem of the culture where our brand is supposed to be playing in order for consumers to identify that sound with our brand?”

Data making a difference

Streaming intelligence data gathered on the moods, preferences and listening habits of Spotify’s 157 million active users is being harnessed by brands to build engaging campaigns. Bertozzi claims the company’s number one priority is respecting its listeners’ data.

“This is our only business model. That app and the music that comes out of it is everything for us, so making sure that that relationship is not disrupted is really important. We have 100% logged in users, so we have a direct relationship with them. All media is on our platform, so those relationships are tightly controlled,” Bertozzi explains.

“A lot of advertisers want our data and they want to put it in data warehouses, we just don’t do that. Our message to advertisers is that we’ve got loads of great ways that you can use this streaming intelligence, but it has to be respectful to our users and it has to be on our platform.”

A recent example of a brand utilising streaming intelligence to share an important social message is the collaboration between Spotify and vodka brand Smirnoff.

Based on Spotify data, which revealed none of the top 10 tracks streamed in 2017 were performed be female artists or bands, Smirnoff decided to redress the balance in time for International Women’s Day 2018 with the launch of the ‘Smirnoff Equalizer’.

The tool provides users with a percentage breakdown of the number of male and female artists they have listened to over the past six months, allowing them opt for an “equalised” playlist that balances it out with female artists personalised to their musical tastes.

Neil Shah, Smirnoff global senior brand manager, describes the campaign as a great example of a brand being clear on its purpose and then leveraging it to have a positive impact on society by delivering something interesting to consumers in a personalised way.

The ‘Equalizer’ tool plays into the way Spotify’s business model works by rewarding artists who attract more streams and bigger fan bases with greater exposure.

The campaign’s core KPIs were to raise awareness of the gender bias in music and enable users to take action. Shah’s team measured the number of visits to the Smirnoff Equalizer platform, paid impressions and earned reach. It also analysed whether listeners were generating and sharing their own playlists, as well as reviewing how overall listening statistics were being affected by the campaign.

With the rise of voice search, Alexa and audio-based platforms like Spotify, Shah believes that marketers will increasingly need to think beyond just their brand’s tone of voice.

Going ‘all in on music as a platform’ has enabled Bacardi to drive real results with its paid strategy.
Fabio Ruffet, Bacardi Europe
“It’s almost a return of radio-like thinking because brands now have to have their own unique sound,” he explains.

“With partnerships like Spotify, where the opportunity exists to interact with consumers in a meaningful and personalised way, it’s important that you have something relevant and interesting to say, otherwise essentially you’re going to be a brand that’s interrupting a user’s listening experience, rather than enriching it. I fundamentally believe brands don’t have the right to do that.”

Artist collaborations

Brands are also finding new routes to connect with listeners on Spotify by linking up with high profile artists.

Making the Spotify environment shoppable is a focus for merchandise specialist Merchbar, which enables artists to bring product listings to their Spotify profile pages. Merchbar recently partnered with beauty company Pat McGrath Labs and US popstar Maggie Lindemann to sell cosmetics from directly from the singer’s Spotify artist page, an industry first.

Merchbar founder and CEO, Edward Aten, explains that Spotify offered the perfect opportunity to take the collaboration between Pat McGrath Labs and Lindemann beyond traditional distribution channels and reach fans in new ways. He believes tie-ups between brands, artists and commercial partners will be the future method to make Spotify shoppable.

“Artists are the most influential group of people in the world, so whether it is through their own merchandise or branded collaborations there is tremendous possibility,” he claims.

“The best part is that as the channels and opportunities keep growing, it’s a huge win for everyone involved – something that’s super rare in the music industry. At the end of the day, you have to start with something that is truly authentic to the artist and resonates deeply with their fans.”

Last year when rum brand Bacardi wanted to change the way emerging Caribbean artists were being represented in the music industry it teamed up with DJ collective Major Lazer on the ‘Music Liberates Music’ project.

The campaign centred on ‘The Sound of Rum’, a Spotify playlist of songs from up-and-coming Caribbean artists, supported by a track from project ambassadors Major Lazer. Every time fans streamed Major Lazer’s track ‘Front of the Line’ and listened to ‘The Sound of Rum’ playlist Bacardi donated studio time to the emerging artists.

 

Major Lazer’s song ended up being streamed 4.6 million times, contributing to 127 hours of studio time for the Caribbean acts. According Fabio Ruffet, creative excellence director for Bacardi Europe, this activity also boosted brand affinity, made listeners more likely to view Bacardi as a “relevant brand” and reinforced the brand’s credibility in being associated with this category of music.

Ruffet believes that going “all in on music as a platform” has enabled Bacardi to drive real results with its paid strategy.

“We have been able to target the right audience at the same time as leveraging our key artist relationship with Major Lazer in an innovative way and giving up-and-coming Caribbean artists a chance to share their music with the world. We had multiple media touchpoints from casual fans all the way down to hardcore EDM [electronic dance music] lovers.”

Data from Bacardi’s ‘Sound of Rum’ playlist reveals that Fridays and Saturdays were the peak days for streaming, with Afrobeat, Dancehall and Crunk standing out as the most popular genres.

Bacardi used similar insight when devising its branded moments campaign on Spotify in 2016. When the brand saw its audience was listening to its party playlists, Bacardi rewarded listeners with 30 minutes of uninterrupted music in exchange for watching a short video. The brand also served mobile overlay ads providing drinks recipes for them to try.

Ruffet advises brands looking to carve out a space on Spotify to leverage data to unlock consumer insights and never forget to get the basics right first.

“Be open to new opportunities, but start with the basics – standard products are proven to drive business results, so it’s important to leverage them to their best,” he suggests.

“Customise. Creative should fit people, platform and a moment in time. And listen to your partner, they know the platform, so can save you from making simple mistakes.”

Speakrs4schools. Best part of my job!

Well today was all about Speakrs4schools. For those are not aware, it is an organisation set up by Robert Peston to help kids in state schools be inspired by people coming into their schools and talking about their journey and advice on how to  approach the daunting prospect of a) having the ambition to go for their dreams and b) getting into work. 

The organisation has had speakers talk in front of 500K students and they want more! Robert Peston was pretty clear – ‘I don’t want to go to Eton or Harrow, why do they need my help, it is State schools that have to help kids broaden their horizons’ that was where it started. He was regularly asked to speak in high end schools but noticed a lack of request from state. Years later he has a 1000 speakers on the books and big backing.

Let me talk about my personal experience, I have probably done around 6 talks so far, and each one is a joy. Watching often shy students slowly get up the courage to ask questions, begin to see signs of some reacting to talks. I have already had students email me to say they have started a blog or got a job etc – it’s so exciting. I hope I have encouraged a few to join LinkedIn and Twitter over the years and start to network. It’s the best part of my career. Give back – it feels good.

Speakrs4schools is now moving into the work experience space with S4Snextgen. Robert Peston hammered home the point that these kids don’t have the networks, they don’t have the privilege that many Interns have, ‘most Interns are populated by nepotism’ so true!! How many sons and daughters of senior staff people have got their kids in work experience? Many many…This is a great next step for companies in our industry to look into and try to support, I know I will be. 

Today saw me travel from Campion School in Northants to No10 in one day and it was an inspiring day! Already some students have LinkedIn! I know a lot of senior people out there in lots of different companies – I encourage you to look into this amazing organisation.

https://www.speakers4schools.org/