Speakrs4schools. Best part of my job!

Well today was all about Speakrs4schools. For those are not aware, it is an organisation set up by Robert Peston to help kids in state schools be inspired by people coming into their schools and talking about their journey and advice on how to  approach the daunting prospect of a) having the ambition to go for their dreams and b) getting into work. 

The organisation has had speakers talk in front of 500K students and they want more! Robert Peston was pretty clear – ‘I don’t want to go to Eton or Harrow, why do they need my help, it is State schools that have to help kids broaden their horizons’ that was where it started. He was regularly asked to speak in high end schools but noticed a lack of request from state. Years later he has a 1000 speakers on the books and big backing.

Let me talk about my personal experience, I have probably done around 6 talks so far, and each one is a joy. Watching often shy students slowly get up the courage to ask questions, begin to see signs of some reacting to talks. I have already had students email me to say they have started a blog or got a job etc – it’s so exciting. I hope I have encouraged a few to join LinkedIn and Twitter over the years and start to network. It’s the best part of my career. Give back – it feels good.

Speakrs4schools is now moving into the work experience space with S4Snextgen. Robert Peston hammered home the point that these kids don’t have the networks, they don’t have the privilege that many Interns have, ‘most Interns are populated by nepotism’ so true!! How many sons and daughters of senior staff people have got their kids in work experience? Many many…This is a great next step for companies in our industry to look into and try to support, I know I will be. 

Today saw me travel from Campion School in Northants to No10 in one day and it was an inspiring day! Already some students have LinkedIn! I know a lot of senior people out there in lots of different companies – I encourage you to look into this amazing organisation.



Video Interview about the future of audio in the connected home with Unruly

I was interviewed by Simon Gosling who runs the Home of the future at Unruly and we covered the topic of audio in the home through connected speakers and how it is impacting everything from music listened to, audio books and radio. Connected speakers have now freed us to do so much more at home and growth is pretty spectacular!

BertozziBytesize: Is nostalgia for vinyl & books a leading indicator of screen burn out?

Record sales are at an all time high, up 30% , they have not been this high since Nirvana’s Nevermind. Books are back – up 6%. We still love to send cards instead of emails when it really matters. Podcasts are growing exponentially, music listening is off the ‘charts’. We often hear about people wanting to ‘touch’ things like the feel of the book, or we relax on a Sunday when we have a newspaper and a coffee. It is a theme right now, a return to the ‘old school’.

I was thinking about this and I feel that we continue to apply rationalisations from 2005-7 to today. I think some of the above is true. Yes you can feel more relaxed with a book or newspaper. The art of putting a record on a player is captivating. It’s the same as rolling a cigarette or lighting a fire, it is a ritual. Settling back and reading a book is relaxing for sure. I am not sure it is for the same reasons today as for a few years ago.

It is because we instinctively know we need a break from screens. 

I don’t like us right now. I don’t like what we have become, what we have become. I hate myself for the amount I stare at screens. My heart sinks when I look around and see everyone buried in their phones, whether it is on a train, in a queue, walking. I notice that people can make it through a dinner party until about 10ish before phones creep out – ‘oh let me show you this video’ ‘let me show you a photo’ ‘let me send you a link’ you see it everywhere, all of the time. It is an addiction. I sit on a couch and check my phone, all the time, I used to watch TV.  We don’t look around when we walk, perhaps the most depressing thing of all. When we go in the car, my son looks out of the window, no screens, he sees stuff and comments. We could all learn from that.

I could go on forever on this topic. I logged out of Facebook for this reason. I am warming up to do the same with others. I feel a slight dread coming because of phone usage. So when people start to buy vinyl, when the book becomes cool again, it’s not because they like the feel of paper or vinyl. It is because they need a break. They want to use their eyes, use their brain without interruption, without a vibration, a drop down, a flash or a beeb. They don’t want to stare into the blue screen for 14 hours a day anymore. Scrolling through pages of irrelevance is starting to knore away at our souls.

The book is back, the coffee and the magazine, the lazy Sunday with the newspapers and music in the background, all of these are key indicators not of some old school desire to touch and feel, but rather that we need a break. Just as with climate change, the signs are there but there are less obvious massive changes, so it is with our behaviour. The signs are there, people need a break, digital detox, logging out of social media, I wonder whether these are the leading indicators amid a world where we shut down and realise how we need to look at our friends and family first and screens second.


BertozziBytesize: I LOVE CES.

There, I said it.

I am a proud CES attendee since 2010. Every year between late December and early January my mind flitters to thoughts of Vegas and CES. Depending on how depressing the weather has been or how much fun we have had determines whether I dwell for a longer or shorter period of time!

Part of this comes from the fact that I still thank my lucky stars for the fact I can travel to Las Vegas, stay in amazing hotels, see so much and do so much as part of my job. I have a persistent gratefulness for the opportunity, same goes for Cannes and all the other events I attend. We are a fortunate group.

On top of that though, is still the feeling of excitement that I got the first year I attended as part of the VivaKi Nerve Center, part of the Curt Hecht, Sean Kegelman, Kurt Unkel crew. I had just left a very depressing role in a depressing company and had the chance, in fact was positively encouraged to come to Vegas, embrace CES and learn everything I could. That first year was an amazing year and we had a great time, That feeling has never left me.

When I hear or read people saying ‘ Oh no, I am not going to CES, that would be the last thing on earth I would choose to do’ I always think the same – Oh come on! followed by the thought that they were not invited or you are not doing CES right. CES is a massive opportunity to learn. Over the years I have written about my experiences – this one in 2013 on TV Measurement or in 2014 I wrote about the fact that data capture and usage was getting out of hand with my post about ‘Just because you can, does not mean you should. Also in 2014 I wrote about the in car tech that was flooding the conference. It was the first time that car manufacturers started to appear in droves. That post called ‘The one piece of tech you cant fit in your pocket.’ Featured in M&M. In 2015 I wrote for the Drum about how advertising feels like it is becoming out paced by technology and hardware driving consumer choices, like the fridge that orders for you and therefore could choose the contents for you. It turns out that Alexa and Dash buttons have taken that role!

You get the idea, this show is FULL of fascinating trends, companies, hardware and you can soak it all up, you can learn from it and you can bring it back to base. If you dont attend these shows everything you hear is 18th hand, you hear it from some guy, who was sent it by another person, which was released by their marketing team. You see and hear things you would never expect to and you become a more knowledgeable person for it. People often ask me one of my biggest lessons I have learned from someone and I always reference Curt Hecht who once said to me, if you dont go to these events but work in a company like the Vivaki Nerve Center which is meant to be future facing, then you are no different to the local digital guy from London who heard it all from their Google, Facebook, Twitter rep. Advertisers want to meet people who have just met Apple at their HQ or spent time with a product manager in Palo Alto. He wanted us to go off and learn, I loved that, because at the time the prevailing sentiment was that going to these things was just a jolly and a waste of time. They can be, if you dont do anything with them.

This year is my second with Spotify. The first year was my first week at the company! You can imagine that was a little crazy, this year I am so excited to be part of this amazing crew and we have a great set up in the C-Space that is designed to help people like me of the past to come and learn something about culture, how we fit into culture, how we use data and understand people through music. We will talk about how voice enabled devices and connected hardware are impacting our lives and where Spotify will fit in that, it is fascinating what’s going on right now and CES has never been more relevant and informative as hardware powered by data and AI is changing our day to day, I hope those who come to the C-Space will walk away having learned a little more.

As someone who works for a specific company, I dont get to see all the interesting behind  the scenes stuff I used to on the agency side, I see and learn different things now about advertiser businesses, agency businesses, our own hardware partners etc, so for those who genuinely do have a choice as to whether or not to come and chose not to, dont  make the same mistake again. CES is the most relevant conference for our industry and understanding culture, you just have to know where to look. If you want to come see Spotify, let me know, it is a pretty cool story!

Coming to your senses: the Spotify Video story, presented at Dmexco

The Spotify journey from Audio to multi sensory platform that encompasses video and audio has been a really interesting one. It continues at pace and has been infused with our unique data proposition as well.

At Demexco we took the main stage and presented it to 600+ people, here it is in all its glory. Some of the videos have been covered, so hold your breathe through a couple of those! CLICK ON THE PHOTO TO LINK TO VIDEO.


Adland came calling. The best of Adland.

On the 19th September at 7pm, over 400 people walked in to the Electric Ballroom in Camden and demonstrated that we work in a very special, amazing industry. The reason was a devastating fire at Grenfell tower. The inspiration for the event came from one person, David Grainger. A month later and some frantic but effective campaigning and the team had raised 70K+, filled 70 tables and created a moment in time not to be forgotten.

The night itself was magical, friends and colleagues from across the industry, agencies both media and creative, publishers, tech firms all misled into this electric evening of music, emotions and love. Advertising is sometimes accused of being lightweight, pointless, not a serious industry but I was so proud of what we achieved in such a short period of time.

More importantly I feel like it was a release to be able to talk and write about something positive and uplifting in relation to the industry. So often the headlines are negative and I have written before that they will be the death of the industry as talent stops wanting to be part of it. This night however we saw the great side to our business, the side that shows we can react fast, that we care and that we are capable of doing good. We should not lose sight of that because behind the headlines lie thousands of good people working their socks off for their clients, trying to enjoy being in our business.

I cant extrapolate this one night to cover everything in our business but what I can say is that the headline writers, the intermediaries that deliver blows to media with glee, the consultants that pile on as they see an opportunity to make money for their short lived businesses need to stop and think about the good of the industry and all the great, passionate, caring, hard working people that populate it and not just a handful of seniors that really the headlines are about.

AdLondonCalling was a night to celebrate, to remember and we should use it as a reason to revel in a great industry and ask those out to tear it apart to think every once in a while about whether they are being too broad in their attacks. I love this business, I have loved agency side and now publisher side, we have a lot to be proud of, thanks Dave for getting this going, lets see how many other positives we can write about..

Programmatic advancement? : Just look to Amsterdam

A few years back, around 2012/13 we discussed how we could grow Audience On Demand more quickly in the region. How could we support all those smaller markets that could not sustain headcount dedicated to programmatic and yet wanted to be part of the picture. Back then we set up the ‘Amsterdam Hub’ for AOD and the very talented Anke Kuik came in to run it for me. We quickly built a buzzy and vibrant business servicing 10+ markets and successfully growing the programmatic footprint of AOD.

As was widely reported, VivaKi eventually decentralised all these teams and so the hub was no more.  Soon after that, I worked on global programmatic strategy across top clients and had the chance to see, hear and contribute to their progress. In almost all cases the advertisers were going back to basics and evaluating their tech, strategies, data plan and more, they wanted to set some common guidelines to many markets. As a result of many of these pieces of work we saw the re-emergence of the hub. Amsterdam is a particular favourite but I think it is fair to say you can find them all over, in London, Paris, US and so on, point being, the Hub is back.

However the big difference with the new hubs, either at a client or agency level are they are there to support ALL markets, big or small. They are there to support tech, data and media buying across a whole range of markets and with that you see a huge shift in how media is being traded, more so than ever before. The true potential of these hubs is becoming a reality, something that has been promised now for some years but is really taking shape and with that shifting the way we all do business. On my side having been a founder of a hub and now on the other side and working with them, it creates a fascinating dynamic as you have to work on many different levels. You need local expertise talking to local countries. You need local people talking to central hubs, you need International teams talking to the hubs. Wow, thats a lot of talking. It is all work and needs lots of coverage of teams, especially where hubs are at an advertiser level.

The thing is, these all take work to start with, but the benefits very quickly become apparent, as the rhythm settles in and people get used to the system, create a list of key partners, know where to go for certain inventory, on the sell side you start to see the benefits, especially where you have such strong, brand safe inventory as Spotify. Suddenly the much vaunted efficiencies of programmatic become apparent and we all start to benefit. Once the heavy lifting is done on the agency side or clients side and all their markets are adjusted to this new way of working then they can spend less time on execution and more on increasing sophistication of offering. Creating trusted market places of inventory, consolidating inventory decisions, partner selection, data strategy can all become the primary focus areas rather than the previously disjointed, inefficient work that happened five years back.

With every passing year this model is really starting to come together and I thoroughly enjoy seeing it, in some ways, even more from the Spotify side. I think we are going to see rapid acceleration (as if it can get faster) in programmatic. The clients and agencies are doing a great job of organising around this new world and I am excited to see how it progresses in the next five years!